What works for me might not work for you. Reverse. Repeat.

Earlier this week I posted my thoughts about DevOps and Continuous Delivery. TheSunshine tester responded on Twitter with a strong defense for Agile

I love that methodologies are able to create such passionate responses. Even amongst the truly committed I doubt I would find any passion for the Waterfall method. Yet the Agile, DevOps, and CD communities seem genuinely excited about working together in this way.

Software Development has greatly improved in the last few years but I still think we have a long way to go before it is considered reliable. Last year CIO.com reported that the majority of ERP projects are over time and over budget. If Agile is truly the silver bullet then all teams would be adopting it, and finding success with it. Unfortunately that doesn’t appear to be the case.

No matter how successful Agile, or any practice might prove to be we should still be seeking new and better ways of working. Humans are unique and our involement makes every project equally unique. The team who has success with agile is unlikely to have the same team make-up, or collective experience as one who doesn’t transition, or who fails to succeed with agile. Our interpretation of what a process involves, and our previous experiences all serve to influence what the end process will actually look like.

We need to have discussions about DevOps because it has arisen from an apparent divide between developers and Ops people. Whether this divide is caused by agile, or a failing of the implementation is irrelevant, the fact is that many teams are finding things as they stand are not good enough.

At Songkick we’ve followed Lean practices for many years. We have small cross-functional teams, daily stand-up meetings and weekly retrospectives. We measure things and try to remain flexible and responsive. Despite this we were having trouble releasing working software. Implementing Continuous Deployment was an enhancement to our agile practices. It went beyond giving us a framework for working together and gave us the steps we needed to make frequent releases too.

One of the criticisms I often hear is ‘it wouldn’t work here’. Hopefully these reservations come from understanding that there are no best practices, but whatever your reason for resisting copy-book change you are right.

What has worked for me, in my team, on my project will never work in exactly this way with your team.

Simply put, best practices do not exist.

Continuous Delivery is the current trendy approach and that is a concern. You should be trying to fix a problem not copy a textbook. If you cannot identify the benefit of any practice, agile ones included, then you shouldn’t be using it. One of the most valuable skills we learned from adopting Continuous Delivery was the ability to review our process and identify exactly what was working and what wasn’t. We continue to review things, making changes as our needs, or the team, changes.

Talk to other teams, listen to their experiences, read widely but use their processes as your guide. The most useful thing you can learn from other teams is how they implemented change. What were the triggers or warning signs? How did they know it was working? How did they choose this change?

These are things that you can apply to your own situation. These are the things that are likely to actually help you deliver good software.

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One comment

  1. ” seeking new and better ways of working.” Indeed, that is all “agile” was intended to be. I wish we could lose all these labels, they can be harmful. “Agile” is simply, as Elisabeth Hendrickson put it so well, delivering business value frequently at a sustainable pace. We don’t have to give that a special name – that is what all teams should strive to do. We can only do the sustainable pace part if businesses allow people to do their best work, give them freedom to experiment, and time to learn. We need to see what “good” practices work for us, right?

    I had a conversation with Kent Beck back in 2001 when we didn’t yet have the term “agile”, so we were talking about XP (Extreme Programming). He told me that he hoped in 10 years nobody would be using the term XP but would be just developing software the best way they could. He was right about the term XP becoming less popular…

    Unfortunately, people still hope there are silver bullets out there, whether it’s “agile” or “test automation” or whatever some vendor or consultant is trying to sell them. But we mustn’t give up trying to do our own best work and being change agents as much as we can!

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