QCon

DevOps with Testers

Last week I spoke at QCon London about Songkick’s experience of moving to Continuous Delivery. You can download the slides, or watch the longer version of this talk on the LondonCD Meetup’s Vimeo channel.

My talk was part of the DevOps and Continuous Delivery track hosted by Eoin Woods. QCon videos of all the talks should be available soon.

One particularly interesting talk was by Steve Thair on ‘DevOps and the need for speed‘. Previously I thought DevOps was about developers and Ops people collaborating to enable faster software delivery. Steve’s definition went much further and ended up being closer to how I think about Continuous Delivery.

Steve defined DevOps as a model that “encompasses a product-centric view across the entire product life-cycle (from inception to retirement) and recognises the value in close collaboration, experimentation and rapid feedback.” He emphasised that the business and testers should be engaging in the collaboration just as much as developers and ops people.

An interesting distinction between Steve’s DevOps definition and Dave Farley’s Continuous Delivery definition focused on the definition of ‘Done’. Continuous Delivery is defined as being about “making businesses more experimental through the early and continuous release of valuable software”. It appears to be complete once the release is out in production. DevOps adds an important final step of evaluating how much value the release is actually adding once it’s in the hands of users.

I love Steve’s definition of DevOps but unfortunately think this term is sadly restricting. I doubt business people or testers will feel included in something called ‘DevOps’. Even more confusingly I believe there are both devs and ops people who do believe ‘DevOps’ only covers devs and ops.

Even re-defining Continuous Delivery to extend beyond the release doesn’t really help the situation. We’re trying to create a process that keeps the software in a state where by it can be released whenever the business wants it to be. Obviously there are some questions around why the business would suddenly decide to release with little notice and whether we should support that or not. Leaving this aside I think Continuous Delivery is a positive way of working to remove unexpected delays to releases.Any process that encourages collaboration and stress-free releases should be given strong consideration in my book.

A name is always just a name but in the case of improving processes and making sure all roles are covered I think it becomes pretty important. We need to hear everyone’s voice as we attempt to fix software development.The concepts being discussed are important and will affect us all. I personally feel that neither the ‘DevOps’ or ‘Continuous Delivery’ terms are quite right for describing an attempt to engage with all stakeholders and release timely, and functioning software to end-users. Regardless of this I believe everyone involved in software design, development and releases should be involved in deciding the best way to fix the software industry.

What do you think? Are you a Continuous Delivery or DevOps fan?
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